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The digital tool developed by the WHO and the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network is helping to combat the disease effectively. By: Abdel Aziz Nabaloum The World Health Organization…

The digital tool developed by the WHO and the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network is helping to combat the disease effectively.

Go Data allows doctors to better gather malaria data from consultations (NewsHour, CC BY-NC 2.0.)
  • Go Data records data on malaria cases and their contacts
  • Malaria management has been improved in certain localities thanks to this tool
  • The software should be integrated into the health system for better disease control

By: Abdel Aziz Nabaloum

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) have developed software to help monitor cases of malaria in Burkina Faso.

Called “Go Data”, this software is being implemented by the Muraz center in Bobo-Dioulasso, in the west of the country. It is designed for community health workers, head nurses and maternity ward managers, and enables them to automatically register detected cases of malaria.

” To register a case, the health worker simply opens the software and enters the patient’s data, and the malaria trend curves are automatically updated “, explains Isidore Traoré, epidemiologist at the Muraz center in Bobo-Dioulasso and head of the “Go Data” project.

Digital tools also make it easier to collect data on patients and those in contact with them. Laboratory results and overall epidemic monitoring can also be recorded.

According to Isidore Traoré, the advantage of this digital tool is that data transmission is much faster. Usually, he says, malaria surveillance data are collected on paper and transmitted either by paper or by telephone.

“So they take a long time to go all the way from the Centre de santé et de promotion sociale (CSPS) to the health district, from the district to the regional health directorate, from the regional health directorate to the population health protection directorate,” he describes.

With “Go Data”, as soon as data is entered into the software, all health workers can instantly see malaria trends in the locality,” stresses the researcher.

Improving care

“Go Data” has already been tested in the Hauts-Bassins region, notably in the Banwali, Kokoro, Bleni, Dan and Pana health and social promotion centers.

According to the project manager, in Pana, where the software was used until October 2023, a total of 9,589 malaria cases were registered, including 4,918 children under 5 and 1,010 pregnant women.

“When we look at the surveillance data, we realize that the software has indeed improved the collection, surveillance and management of malaria in this locality,” explains Isidore Traoré.

He adds that when the health worker performs the rapid diagnostic test (RDT), if the patient is positive for malaria, he or she is referred for treatment. As a result, people who didn’t go to the hospital now do.

“This really increases the number of people going for consultations to benefit from quality care, rather than self-medicating,” he says.

Detecting epidemics

In 2022, Burkina Faso recorded 8,019,000 cases of malaria. The disease accounted for 39% of consultations, 41.35% of hospitalizations and 17.22% of deaths in health facilities.

The digital tool not only helps visualize graphs and curves in real time to track malaria cases, but also contributes to the rapid detection of possible epidemics and to monitoring alert and epidemic thresholds.

According to Isidore Traoré, when cases are recorded and an increase in the number of cases is observed, either approaching or exceeding the alert threshold, or even reaching the epidemic threshold, at each stage there are actions to be taken to control this health problem.

The ” Go Data ” tool has been developed as part of the Initiative of Scientific Research Granting Agencies (IOSRS) in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Go Data, software to improve malaria surveillance in Burkina Faso

The digital tool developed by the WHO and the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network is helping to combat the disease effectively. By: Abdel Aziz Nabaloum The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) have developed software to help monitor…

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